Illness representations among adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: associations with quality of life, coping, and treatment adherence.

Related Articles

Illness representations among adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: associations with quality of life, coping, and treatment adherence.

Heliyon. 2019 Oct;5(10):e02705

Authors: Wong IYT, Hawes DJ, Dar-Nimrod I

Abstract
Research into the causes and outcomes of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been extensive, yet little is known about the perception of ADHD as a disorder and its related outcomes among diagnosed youth. The present study applied the Common-Sense Model of Illness Representations (CSM) to examine the perception of ADHD and its association with quality of life (QoL), coping strategies, and treatment adherence among 63 diagnosed adolescents (10-18 years). Adolescents recruited from clinics, parent support groups, and an educational service completed self-report measures of the key constructs. Results indicated that adolescents generally perceive their ADHD as mildly threatening; four illness beliefs (perceived impact, personal control, timeline, and coherence) are significant predictors of coping and four (perceived impact, causes, personal control, and treatment control) are that of QoL. Adolescents who perceived minimal impact, expected longer duration, had strong sense of coherence, and believed in personal control of ADHD coped with the disorder more actively. Those who made weaker attribution to psychological and environmental causes, believed in personal control and the effectiveness of behavioral treatment enjoyed better QoL. In addition, female adolescents seem to experience more difficulties in the management of ADHD than male counterparts. These findings have potentially important clinical implications, suggesting that perceptions of ADHD related to the disorder’s impact, duration, coherence, and personal control, may be important for clinicians to address when caring for adolescents with the disorder.

PMID: 31687524 [PubMed]

via https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31687524?dopt=Abstract


Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>