Child skills training for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): A randomized controlled trial of structured dyadic behavior therapy (SDBT).

Child skills training for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): A randomized controlled trial of structured dyadic behavior therapy (SDBT).

Psychotherapy (Chic). 2020 May 21;:

Authors: Curtis DF, Heath CL, Hogan WJ

Abstract
This pilot study examined structured dyadic behavior therapy (SDBT) as a novel, child skills training intervention for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The purpose of this study was to (a) pilot the feasibility of SDBT, a manualized, child skills training intervention, (b) determine the potential clinical benefits of SDBT as an independent psychotherapy for ADHD, and (c) examine parents’ intervention acceptability. Children of 8-12 years of age with ADHD-combined type (N = 34) were randomly assigned to either SDBT or an “attention control” condition receiving child-centered dyadic therapy (CCDT). SDBT targeted high-frequency behavioral and social demands often challenging for children with ADHD. CCDT provided nondirective, experiential psychotherapy without any contingency management methods. Descriptive data revealed a high level of treatment attendance and completion (90%) for both conditions. General linear modeling techniques (multivariate analysis of variance) examined group differences in ADHD outcomes. Results indicated statistically significant differences between the two groups, with greater ADHD symptom reduction for SDBT (Wilks’ λ = .61), F(3, 30) = 6.36, p = .002, ηp² = .39. SDBT also demonstrated clinically meaningful changes, with ADHD symptom severity reduced below categorical levels of functional impairment. Despite superior behavioral outcomes for SDBT, intervention acceptability did not significantly differ for the two psychotherapies. Results support SDBT as a feasible, clinically promising, and acceptable intervention for ADHD. Parent satisfaction ratings suggest dyadic therapies may benefit participants beyond symptom reduction. Implications for intervention portability and treating ADHD without direct adult participation are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).

PMID: 32437191 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

via https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32437191?dopt=Abstract


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