Atomoxetine produces oxidative stress and alters mitochondrial function in human neuron-like cells.

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Atomoxetine produces oxidative stress and alters mitochondrial function in human neuron-like cells.

Sci Rep. 2019 Sep 10;9(1):13011

Authors: Corona JC, Carreón-Trujillo S, González-Pérez R, Gómez-Bautista D, Vázquez-González D, Salazar-García M

Abstract
Atomoxetine (ATX) is a non-stimulant drug used in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and is a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. It has been shown that ATX has additional effects beyond the inhibition of norepinephrine reuptake, affecting several signal transduction pathways and alters gene expression. Here, we study alterations in oxidative stress and mitochondrial function in human differentiated SH-SY5Y cells exposed over a range of concentrations of ATX. We found that the highest concentrations of ATX in neuron-like cells, caused cell death and an increase in cytosolic and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species, and alterations in mitochondrial mass, membrane potential and autophagy. Interestingly, the dose of 10 μM ATX increased mitochondrial mass and decreased autophagy, despite the induction of cytosolic and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Thus, ATX has a dual effect depending on the dose used, indicating that ATX produces additional active therapeutic effects on oxidative stress and on mitochondrial function beyond the inhibition of norepinephrine reuptake.

PMID: 31506604 [PubMed – in process]

via https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31506604?dopt=Abstract


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